Eating Large versus Eating Well

Come on, you know it too but still make the bad choice: selecting meals by quantity over quality. Not that I believe it is all our fault that we do. Every over-sized portion ever dished out to you carefully conditioned you to believe, really believe that a small portion cannot possibly satisfy. That the small portion of anything will leave you hungry and looking for more. But this is a trick!

Did you ever stop to wonder why so many chain restaurants offer you large portions in the first place? Our bodies gauge hunger not on how empty the stomach is, but on how many nutrients we need. I recall from my Psych 101 lecture that some cravings is the body telling you its need of a specific nutrient.  Could it be that a small portion of their food really wouldn’t satisfy you because it lacks enough nutrients to convince your body it is well-fed? I think so. (You are welcome to think the opposite. Power to you, friend, if you do.)

For the past year I have taken more interest in what food I am eating, how to prepare it, how much gets eaten. What became abundantly clear to me is: the nicer the food got, the less I ate; even when I really enjoyed eating it in the first place.

The reverse of eating well, whenever I chose to indulge in some “fun” by eating some junk food, the impulse to stop eating never arose. Hence a large bag of potato chips gets finished in one or two sittings. For that matter, there has never been such a thing as day-old pizza in my house– it never lasts that long. In fact that impulse to not eat wouldn’t come back for several days after indulging in junk food. No surprise, now that we know eating the wrong proportion of sugar, salt and fat together actually alters the human brain.

My advice to you? Seek out foods that make you feel good for how they taste, not how full they make you. Bad food will never make you full; good food will make you happy in ways that a full stomach never could!

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About rocjoe

Once a full-time software developer. Chances are if you've paid for a beer or a sandwich on any major airline in the past 5 years, code I wrote has reached you. I shifted to part-time software developing about a year ago, as a step towards a better quality of life. I still code but the 20-hour work days are a thing of the past. Lately I amuse myself by pretending I am a witty and insightful blogger. All three of those things ("witty", "insightful" and "blogger") are totally false. My promise to you: nowhere in this blog will you see source-code or technical speak. This is purely a blog for personal fun and discovery. View all posts by rocjoe

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